Seleka's action last ditch for Muslims in CAR

Seleka groups' moving forward to the north of CAR is Muslim's last ditch, says geopolitic expert Abdulhalim

Seleka groups' moving forward to the north of CAR is Muslim's last ditch, says geopolitic expert Abdulhalim

TUNIS, Tunisia - The mainly Muslim Seleka groups' move forward to the north of the Central African Republic (CAR) is Muslim's last ditch, says Egyptian geopolitic expert Amira Abdulhalim on Thursday.

Abdulhalim from Cairo-based Al-Ahram Geopolitical Research Center, told Anadolu Agency that it is the last ditch for Muslims to regain their lost rights and honor.

The mineral-rich country descended into anarchy one year ago when Muslim Seleka rebels ousted Christian president Francois Bozize, who had come to power in a 2003 coup.

Since last December, thousands of mainly Muslims, have been killed in sectarian violence blamed on the anti-balaka militia throughout the country.

Abdulhalim also stated that deployed international forces are gathered in the capital city of Bangui, but the violence continues in the upcountry. He said that when the United Nations Security Council decided to send 12,000 blue berets in September to CAR, the decision was "risible", as by then it was too late.

The judiciary system is supposed to protect Muslim's right who are tortured by Christian anti-balaka group, Abdulhalim said but Cameroonian geopolitic expert Eric Owona Nguini says Seleka's occupation of the border city of Bossangoa and its threat to enter Bangui reminds us of Sudan's division in July 9, 2011.

Nguini, from Yaunde University, who is gaining ground in Seleka may draw anti-Balaka's reaction and it may bring the country to a point of no return.

According to the UN refugee agency, around 173,000 people had been internally displaced while 37,000 others had fled to neighboring countries.

Some 1,600 French and 6,000 African peacekeepers are currently deployed in the mineral-rich, landlocked country.

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