Turkey's judiciary 'not a place for traps': top judge

Turkey's judiciary should be 'fair' despite changing power relations within the state, says head of the country's highest court.

Turkey's judiciary should be 'fair' despite changing power relations within the state, says head of the country's highest court.

ANKARA - Turkey has witnessed the formation of a 'new body to politically control' the judicial system, said Hasim Kilic, head of the Constitutional Court, during its 52nd anniversary of foundation. 

In February, President Abdullah Gul approved a draft law proposing to transfer some of the powers of Turkey's High Council of Judges and Prosecutors (HSYK) to the justice minister. 

However, the top court rejected the draft law and repealed the justice minister's power to appoint the HSYK members to the departments within the body of the HSYK. 

The HSYK elects members of the Court of Cassation, the highest appellate court, and the Council of State, the highest administrative court. This makes the HSYK a powerful administrative body in Turkey's judiciary. 

Kilic said that the judiciary should be 'fair' and 'impartial' despite changing power relations within the state. 

"Political, ideological, religious and racial influence in the judiciary should be strongly rejected by anyone including members of the judiciary," Kilic said.

Kilic said the rule of law in the courts couldn't be directed by 'feelings of friendship and enmity.' 

"The judiciary is not the place to set traps to the will of the nation," he said.

Copyright © 2014 Anadolu Agency